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Africa North
Algeria Crisis Ends in Bloodbath and France Confirms Troops Will Stay in Mali to 'Defeat Terrorism'
2013-01-20
[An Nahar] A dramatic four-day hostage crisis at an Algerian gas plant ended in a bloodbath Saturday when Islamists executed all seven of their remaining foreign captives as troops stormed the desert complex.

Twenty-one hostages, including an unknown number of foreigners, died during the siege that began when the al-Qaeda-linked gunnies attacked the facility deep in the Sahara at dawn on Wednesday, the interior ministry said.

Thirty-two kidnappers were also killed, and special forces were able to free "685 Algerian workers and 107 foreigners," the ministry said.

The kidnappers led by Algerian Mokhtar Belmokhtar, a former al-Qaeda commander in North Africa, killed two people on a bus, a Briton and an Algerian, before taking hundreds of workers hostage when they overran the In Amenas complex.

Belmokhtar's "Signatories in Blood" group had been demanding an end to French military intervention against jihadists in neighboring Mali.

In Saturday's assault, "the Algerian army took out 11 terrorists, and the terrorist group killed seven foreign hostages," state television
... and if you can't believe state television who can you believe?
said, without giving a breakdown of their nationalities.

A security official who spoke to AFP as army helicopters overflew the plant gave the same corpse counts, adding it was believed the foreigners were executed "in retaliation".

As experts began to clear the complex of bombs planted by the Islamists, residents of In Amenas breathed a collective sigh of relief.

"We went from a peaceful situation to a terror situation," said one resident who gave his name as Fouad.

"The plant could have went kaboom! and taken out the town," said another.

Brahim Zaghdaoui said he was not surprised by the Algerian army's ruthless final assault.

"It was predictable that it would end like that," he said.

Most of the hostages had been freed on Thursday when Algerian forces launched a rescue operation, which was widely condemned as hasty.

But French President Francois Hollande
...the Socialist president of La Belle France, and a fine job he's doing of it...
and U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta
...current SecDef, previously Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Panetta served as President Bill Clinton's White House Chief of Staff from 1994 to 1997 and was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1977 to 1993....
refused to lay the blame on Algeria.

The Algiers government's response was "the most appropriate" given it was dealing with "coldly determined bully boyz ready to kill their hostages," said Hollande.

Panetta added: "They are in the region, they understand the threat from terrorism... I think it's important that we continue to work with (Algiers) to develop a regional approach."

British Defense Secretary Philip Hammond said the crisis had been "brought to an end by a further assault by Algerian forces, which has resulted in further loss of life".

"We're pressing the Algerians for details on the exact situation," he said.

The deaths were "appalling and unacceptable and we must be clear that it is the bully boyz who bear sole responsibility for it," he told a news conference with Panetta.

The hostage-taking was the largest since the 2008 Mumbai attack, and the biggest by jihadists since hundreds were killed in a Moscow theater in 2002 and at a school in the Russian town of Beslan in 2004, according to monitoring group IntelCenter.

Foreign Secretary William Hague said five British nationals and a British resident are dead or unaccounted for.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan said he had received "severe information" about 10 of his country's nationals who were still missing.

On Friday the gunnies, cited by Mauritania's ANI news agency, said they were still holding "seven foreign hostages" -- three Belgians, two Americans, one Japanese and a Briton.

However,
the hip bone's connected to the leg bone...
Brussels said it had no indication any of its nationals were being held.

Algeria was strongly criticized for launching the initial assault, which the kidnappers said had left dead 34 of the hostages and 15 of their own fighters.

Belmokhtar also wanted to exchange American hostages for the blind Egyptian sheikh Omar Abdul Rahman and Pak Aafia Siddiqui
...American-educated Pak cognitive neuroscientist who was convicted of assault with intent to murder her U.S. interrogators in Afghanistan. In September 2010, she was sentenced to 86 years in jug after a three-ring trial. Siddiqui, using the alias Fahrem or Feriel Shahin, was one of six alleged al-Qaeda members who bought $19 million worth of blood diamonds in Liberia immediately prior to 9-11-01. Since her incarceration Paks have taken her to their heart and periodically erupt into demonstrations, while the government tries to find somebody to swap for her...
, placed in durance vile
Yez got nuttin' on me, coppers! Nuttin'!
in the United States on charges of terrorist links.

At least one American had already been confirmed dead before Saturday's assault.

But the State Department said "the United States does not negotiate with terrorists".

La Belle France, which said on Saturday that 2,000 of the 2,500 troops it had pledged were now on the ground in Mali, said that no more of its citizens were being held.

President Hollande said French troops would stay in Mali as long as is needed "to defeat terrorism" in the West African country and its neighbors.

Algerian news agency APS quoted a government official as saying the kidnappers, who claimed to have come from Niger, were armed with machineguns, assault rifles, rocket launchers and missiles.

This was confirmed by an Algerian driver, Iba El Haza, who said the hostage-takers spoke in different Arabic dialects and perhaps also in English.

"From their accents I understood one was Egyptian, one Tunisian, another Algerian and one was speaking English or (another) foreign language," Haza told AFP after escaping on Thursday.

"The bully boyz said: 'You have nothing to do with this, you are Algerians and Mohammedans. We won't keep you, we only want the foreigners.'"
Posted by:Fred

#12  a tragic accident for her....
Posted by: Frank G   2013-01-20 22:13  

#11  What gorb said.
Posted by: Barbara   2013-01-20 21:38  

#10  ditto gorb
Posted by: Frank G   2013-01-20 19:52  

#9  The Algerians get it. They get Americans, too. Inviting us in would have slowed things down and resulted in more deaths once the politicians started the obligatory handwringing and resulting waffling. Bravo for them. They did the job with what they had. I'll bet we don't see much of an encore from the bad guys there for a while. Unless the idiots at the UN create problems so they'll have more jobs for themselves in the future.
Posted by: gorb   2013-01-20 19:32  

#8  I just found out there's a really bad video named Nuclear Rick Roll.
Posted by: Shipman   2013-01-20 16:23  

#7  Now, when it's over---can we ask what youtube video caused this attack?
Posted by: g(r)omgoru   2013-01-20 14:27  

#6  Putting together powerpoints while the FBI negotiator flew into town a la Mersk Alabama would have been exactly their plan.
Posted by swksvolFF


Whahhaha, (actually not funny) but you certainly nailed it!
Posted by: Besoeker   2013-01-20 11:52  

#5  Don't know, kind of get the impression that the Algerians were not really approaching it as a hostage rescue mission. Sure did seem like the hostage exchange video was released as scheduled, not scheduled was such a quick counter-attack.

792 put at risk by a planned coordinated attack/take hostage mission and 32(?) lost. The baddies knew it was a one way road, what if they had pulled a Die Hard, asking for prisoner exchange while rigging the plant, ultimately to blow it and the hostages. Putting together powerpoints while the FBI negotiator flew into town a la Mersk Alabama would have been exactly their plan.
Posted by: swksvolFF   2013-01-20 11:49  

#4  It is a miracle, Hillary is able to talk again and she actually mentioned the word "terrorism!" Gasp! I thought I heard Zero mention this terrible "T" word that here-to-fore has not been mentioned during this administration.
Posted by: Glusosing Angolurt1779   2013-01-20 10:29  

#3  rough handling by the Algerians. Yes - it does convey as message of "No Compromise" to the terrorists. And ultimtaely by taking a very hard line Algeria may have fewer problems in the future. But it's far from clear that Algerian forces had the training or methods to handle a hostage situation with precision - sparing the lives of the hostages while taking out the terrorists.

BP will probably face civil lawsuits over the deaths. Questions remain about why these terrorists were able to penetrate the BP facility so easily. It definitely appears that the security precuations were lax .... which is unexplainable given the threat in the Sahara region.
Posted by: Raider   2013-01-20 10:29  

#2  wanna bet Zero has the urge to lower flags to half-staff when Hoogo croaks?
Posted by: Frank G   2013-01-20 10:13  

#1  But the State Department said "the United States does not negotiate with terrorists"

Terrorists that have been duly elected to office, however, get White House visits.
Posted by: Pappy   2013-01-20 10:09  

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